in Quantitative Aptitude edited by
1,897 views
7 votes
7 votes

In a detailed study of annual crow births in India, it was found that there was relatively no growth during the period $2002$ to $2004$ and a sudden spike from $2004$ to $2005$. In another unrelated study, it was found that the revenue from cracker sales in India which remained fairly flat from $2002$ to $2004$, saw a sudden spike in $2005$ before declining again in $2006$. The solid line in the graph below refers to annual sale of crackers and the dashed line refers to the annual crow births in India. Choose the most appropriate inference from the above data.

  1. There is a strong correlation between crow birth and cracker sales.
  2. Cracker usage increases crow birth rate.
  3. If cracker sale declines, crow birth will decline.
  4. Increased birth rate of crows will cause an increase in the sale of crackers.
in Quantitative Aptitude edited by
1.9k views

1 comment

B and D are not possible, because from the given information we cannot infer that one event is the cause of another.

C is partially correct because it doesn’t handle the other possibility that, if cracker sales increase, the crow birth rate also increases.

is the answer

0
0

1 Answer

4 votes
4 votes
Best answer
In the above graph, we can clearly see that,

During the period $2002$ to $2004$, there was relatively no crow birth.

Whereas, cracker sales also remain flat from $2002$ to $2004$.

In between $2004$ to $2005$, there was a sudden spike in crow birth.

& in this period, cracker sales also increase.

In $2006$, crow birth decreases, cracker sale also decreases.

So, we can say that $\text{there was a strong correlation between crow birth and cracker sales}$.

$\text{Hence, the answer is option A)}$
selected by

4 Comments

Why not D?
0
0
Not sure but from 2003 to 2004 there is an increase in the birth rate of crows and the sale of crackers has remained constant, and hence not D.
1
1

I think, option A is super set of option C.

1
1
Answer:

Related questions