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The Boolean function obtained by adding an inverter to each and every input of an $AND$ gate is:

  1. $OR$
  2. $XOR$
  3. $NAND$
  4. $NOR$
  5. None of the above
in Digital Logic
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0

@techbd123

@Satbir

I am getting $\mathbf{OR}$ as the answer.

Can you please check this once.

0
it is called bubbled AND gate. answer is NOR.
0
Yeah, I know that answer is NOR but the truth table represents OR gate as well.
0
A B C
0 0 0
0 1 1
1 0 1
1 1 1

I am getting this truth table after following what is said in the question.

So, why not OR gate.

1
$A$ $B$ $A'$ $B'$ $A'.B'$
0 0 1 1 1
0 1 1 0 1
1 0 0 1 1
1 1 0 0 0

We are getting NOR as output

0
Oh yes that was the mistake.

I was comparing with A and B and not A' and B'.

Thanks Man!!

1 Answer

15 votes
 
Best answer
Invert-AND = NOR

For example, $A'B' = \overline{A+B}$

$[$Note : Invert-OR = NAND, $A'+B' = \overline{A.B}]$

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