in Calculus edited by
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19 votes
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The formula used to compute an approximation for the second derivative of a function $f$ at a point $X_0$ is

  1. $\dfrac{f(x_0 +h) + f(x_0 – h)}{2}$

  2. $\dfrac{f(x_0 +h) - f(x_0 – h)}{2h}$

  3. $\dfrac{f(x_0 +h) + 2f(x_0) + f(x_0 – h)}{h^2}$ 

  4. $\dfrac{f(x_0 +h) - 2f(x_0) + f(x_0 – h)}{h^2}$ 

in Calculus edited by
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3 Answers

16 votes
16 votes
Best answer
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3 Comments

edited by

just_bhavana 

The below formula is also correct ...right ??? 

             Because Left-Hand-Derivative = Right Hand Derivative //Else f ' (x) doesnot exist at that point.

Similiarly Left hand second derivative should be equal to right hand second derivative ..right ??? In that case below formula will also be correct ..right ?? 

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41

 Vicky rix

but how u derive option d from ur comment

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0
Hello vicky rix

Yes that's also true. in your final answer , we can say that $f''(x)$=$f''(x+h)$=$f''(x-h)$

so when you substitute $x$ by $x-h$ you will get the original answer.
7
7
21 votes
21 votes

Simplest Approach! 

3 votes
3 votes
Let f(x) = 3x^2 and X0 = 2
Now, substitute for all the options. Only option (d) will come out to be true.